Badminton Guide

Why it is Popular in Bangladesh

Badminton is a very popular sport in Bangladesh and is played mostly in the winter season throughout the country. In 1972, the Bangladesh Badminton Federation was formed and is responsible for managing and developing the sport. Badminton had faded away in Bangladesh but recently the federation got better officials to bring the sport back into popularity. They have also been able to acquire sponsors for the sport, therefore making it more available to play as a competing sport. The Bangladesh Badminton Federation organizes talent hunt programs across the country to get players formed into teams. They now regularly hold many national championships. They also participate in international championships, competing with other teams around the world. Today, badminton is one of their main sports for competing and for fun.

How it is Played

The goal in badminton is to hit the shuttle with your racket so that it passes over the net and lands inside your opponent’s half of the court. When you do this, you have won a rally; win enough rallies, and you win the entire match. Your opponent has the same goal. He or she will try to reach the shuttle and send it back into your half of the court. You can also win rallies from your opponent’s mistakes: if he or she hits the shuttle into or under the net, or out of court, then you win the rally. If you think your opponent’s shot is going to land out, then you should let it fall to the floor. If you hit the shuttle instead, then the rally continues. Once the shuttle touches the ground, the rally is over. In this respect, badminton is not like tennis or squash, where the ball can bounce. You must hit the shuttle once only before it goes over the net (even in doubles). Also, badminton is not like volleyball either, where multiple players can touch the ball before sending it back over the net.

The Basic Rules

Scoring System
◦A match consists of the best of 3 games of 21 points.
◦Every time there is a serve – there is a point scored.
◦The side winning a rally adds a point to its score.
◦At 20 all, the side which gains a 2 point lead first, wins that game.
◦At 29 all, the side scoring the 30th point, wins that game.
◦The side winning a game serves first in the next game.

Interval and Change of Ends
◦When the leading score reaches 11 points, players have a 60 second interval.
◦A 2 minute interval between each game is allowed.
◦In the third game, players change ends when the leading score reaches 11 points.

Singles
◦At the beginning of the game (0-0) and when the server’s score is even, the server serves from the right service court. When the server’s score is odd, the server serves from the left service court.
◦If the server wins a rally, the server scores a point and then serves again from the alternate service court.
◦If the receiver wins a rally, the receiver scores a point and becomes the new server. They serve from the appropriate service court – left if their score is odd, and right if it is even.

Doubles
◦A side has only one service.
◦The service passes consecutively to the players as shown in the diagram.
◦At the beginning of the game and when the score is even, the server serves from the right service court. When it is odd, the server serves from the left court.
◦If the serving side wins a rally, the serving side scores a point and the same server serves again from the alternate service court.
◦If the receiving side wins a rally, the receiving side scores a point. The receiving side becomes the new serving side.
◦The players do not change their respective service courts until they win a point when their side is serving.
Sports Equipment Needed

Badminton equipment required to play, according to the regulations of the sport, includes rackets, shuttles, net, posts, and court:

Racket

The frame of the badminton racket consists of a handle attached to a shaft, which connects to the throat and head of the racket. The head is strung with interwoven synthetic string. Each player holds a racket. Rackets are used to hit the shuttle during play.

Shuttle

The ball-shaped base of the shuttle is made of rubber or cork and covered in leather. The base holds the skirt of the shuttle to which there are connecting feathers that project backward and outward. The shuttle is the small object hit back and forth across the net.

Net

The badminton net’s dimensions are 2.5 feet tall and 20 feet wide. The top of the net must be 5 feet from the ground. A white, folded 3 inch wide tape forms the top edge of the badminton net with a cord running through the tape to hold the net. This net is what divides both sides of teams and where the shuttle is hit over to the other side.

Posts

The posts that hold the net on either side of the court are 5 feet tall. The net ties to the post to keep it hung up.

Court

The outside dimensions of the court are visibly marked 20 feet wide by 44 feet long. A center line divides the court evenly lengthwise. The marked line at the end of the court serves as the singles long service line. A doubles long service line across both sides of the court must be marked 2.5 feet closer to the net. A short service line must be marked across both sides of the court and 6.5 feet from the net.

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