How to handle your appraisal at work

Employee appraisals are routine in most companies today. Job performance is typically evaluated once or twice a year, although new employees may be appraised after ninety days to see if their credentials are a good match for the position.

Typically, a supervisor conducts the appraisal, and records his or her observations in a report that is then shared with the employee. When this happens, employees who hold jobs in Dhaka, for example, have an opportunity to benefit and grow, even when some of the feedback is negative.

Be open-minded.

Avoid becoming defensive when weaknesses, mistakes, or opportunities for improvement are mentioned. Try to view your work performance objectively by understanding that the supervisor has the company’s and the employee’s best interests in mind. Remember that everyone’s work performance gets evaluated, and it can provide insight to career development.

Be objective.

Listen carefully to understand what is being said. Ask questions for clarity if needed. If just a general behavior is mentioned, for example, carelessness, politely ask for an example to better understand the supervisor’s concern. Try to see your job performance through the supervisor’s eyes.

Be honest.

If you don’t understand some aspect of the job, explain that to the supervisor. If something about the evaluation process bothers you, point it out. It’s much better to be open and direct about any concerns you have than to keep quiet and let your frustration build up inside. You don’t want to end up getting angry at someone later or becoming depressed because you feel frustrated.

Accept suggestions for improvement.

If the supervisor recommends a change of approach for jobs in Bangladesh, it is a good idea to listen and try to go along with it unless you can see weaknesses or have a better idea. At least be willing to give the suggestion a try and see if that helps to improve the situation. Avoid being confrontational or argumentative, although it is fine to politely question or disagree.

Offer suggestions for improvement.

Take a proactive attitude and suggest ways you could handle the job better than previously if criticisms are discussed. The supervisor will be likely to admire your willingness to improve your job performance and consider your ideas for handling things differently. At the very least it shows that you are committed to your position and want to do a good job.

Accept praise modestly.

When your supervisor praises positive skills or achievements, be appreciative but don’t be tempted to brag or have an arrogant attitude. Express gratitude for the opportunity of working with the company and the chance to get feedback that can help you become a better employee. Also share the praise by mentioning others who may have assisted with certain tasks.

Ask for new opportunities.

If you are doing a pretty good job in your current position, you may want to keep an eye on future vacancies. This will help you to continue developing new skills that can make you even more marketable for positions higher up in the company. You can ask about the kinds of qualities the company will be hiring for managerial positions, if desired, or what is required to earn a pay increase.

A job appraisal can be a very effective tool for assessing work duties and determining what is working well as opposed to what needs to be changed or adjusted. Getting a fair evaluation, even when it contains critical comments, can be very helpful for employees who want to improve and become more valuable to the company, both now and in the future.

A detailed job evaluation can help employees prepare for a future career move if one is desired. It also builds a mutual bond of trust between supervisors and employees, as well as helping to guide an employee’s development in learning the job. Supervisors understand which are the strongest employees and often keep them in mind for future promotions. Overall, a job appraisal benefits both the company and the employee and provides a written record of shared information that can be used in the future if needed.

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